Spilonota constrictana (Meyrick, 1881)
(one synonym is Ancylis panolbia Turner, 1946)
EUCOSMINI ,   OLETHREUTINAE ,   TORTRICIDAE ,   TORTRICOIDEA
  
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Spilonota constrictana
(Photo: courtesy of Mark Ridgway, Ferntree Gully, Victoria)

These Caterpillars live in cases composed of one, two or three stiff chambers made from hollowed-out flower buds or seed capsules, each like an inflated cube. The caterpillars feed on the flowers of

  • Bottlebrushes ( Calestemon species ), and
  • Paperbarks ( Melaleuca species ),

    both of MYRTACEAE.

    The case can grow to a total length of about 1.2 cms. The caterpillar pupates in its case.

    Spilonota constrictana
    (Photo: courtesy of Leuba Ridgway, Emerald, Victoria)

    The adult moths have pale brown heads, and off-white forewings each with grey speckles which coalesce in places to form several vague dark transverse bands. The hindwings are plain grey. The grey fades to brown in dead specimens. The wingspan is about 1.2 cms.

    The species occurs in Australia in:

  • Queensland,
  • New South Wales,
  • Australian Capital Territory, and
  • Victoria.


    Further Reading

    Marianne Horak and Furumi Komai,
    Olethreutine Moths of Australia: (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae),
    Monographs on Australian Lepidoptera series. Vol. 10,
    CSIRO Publishing, 2006, pp. ii, 24, 41-42, 49, 342, 347, 349-351, 353, 355, 369.

    Edward Meyrick,
    Description of Australian Micro-lepidoptera XII Oecophoridae,
    Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales,
    Series 1, Volume 6, Number 3 (1881), pp. 675-676.

    A. Jefferis Turner,
    Contributions to our knowledge of the Australian Tortricidae (Lepidoptera) Part II,
    Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia,
    Volume 70 (1946), p. 200.


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    (written 3 February 2017)