Palmartona catoxantha (Hampson, 1893)
(formerly known as Brachartona catoxantha)
PROCRIDINAE,   ZYGAENIDAE,   ZYGAENOIDEA
  
Don Herbison-Evans
(donherbisonevans@outlook.com)
and
Stella Crossley

Palmartona catoxantha
female
(Photo: courtesy of the Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)

The Caterpillars of this species are slug-like, and are pale yellow with dark stripes. In later instars, the stripes fade, except for the main dorsal stripe which becomes dark purple. The caterpillars have been found feeding on the foliage of various Palms, ( ARECACEAE ), including

  • Coconuts ( Cocos nucifera ),
  • Fan Palms ( Livistona species), and
  • Sago Palms ( Metroxylon species).

    Early instars feed on the underside of the leaves, and skeletonise the leaves. The final instar actually eats whole leaves, making characteristic holes. The caterpillars are sometimes a pest on Coconut Palms.

    Palmartona catoxantha
    male
    (Photo: courtesy of the Photography Group, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph)

    The adult moths are brown, with a yellow edge to the costa of each hindwing. The underside of the body is yellow. The wingspan is about 1.5 cms.

    The species has been found across south-east Asia, including:

  • Myanmar,
  • Philippines,

    as well as in Australia in

  • Queensland.


    Further Reading:

    Gerhard M. Tarmann,
    Zygaenid moths of Australia,
    CSIRO Publishing 2004, pp. 1, 4, 31, 42. 47, 58, 60, 203, 207-213, pl 56.

    George Francis Hampson,
    Lepidoptera: Moths,
    in W.T. Blandford (ed.):
    The Fauna of British India, including Ceylon and Burma
    Volume 1 (1893), p. 233, No. 480.


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    (written 23 December 2018)